The El Segundo Hometown Fair – Saturday May 4th

May 9th, 2013

EL SEGUNDO HOMETOWN FAIR – SATURDAY MAY 4TH 

Saturday May 4th marked El Segundo’s annual Hometown Fair in the 600 block of Main Street at Library Park.

The Study Hut had a booth at the El Segundo Hometown Fair and passed out fliers and talking to parents and students during the event.

El Segundo Police Department had a display in Library Park that included members from the SWAT team, a motorcycle officer, crime prevention information and a K9 demo at 1 PM.

The event featured carnival rides, a bake-off contest, bike parade, arts and crafts, music, game and food booths; live entertainment and more; where cash prizes will be awarded Co-sponsored by the El Segundo Recreation and Parks Department and the Associated Student Body of El Segundo High School. . It ran from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

For the bake off,  entries were accepted at the Hometown Fair between 9:30am to 11:00am at the Gazebo in Library Park.

The three entries were:

1.) Breads, rolls, sweetbreads and muffins
2.) Cakes and pies
3.) Small sweets and cookies

Wrist bands for carnival rides were $6, and tickets for an electric bike giveaway (valued at $2,000) cost $5.

There was no parking allowed in the 600 blocks of Main St and Richmond St from 6 AM – 6 PM.

The park is located at:

Library Park
101 W. Mariposa Ave.
El Segundo, CA 90245

For more information, call 310-524-2700.

STAR Testing!

April 16th, 2013

Let us help your student put the “Star” in STAR Testing!!! 

Each spring, students in grades two through eleven take a STAR test. The STAR Program looks at how well schools and students are performing. Students take tests in math, reading, writing, science, and history. Teachers and parents can use test results to improve student learning.

The STAR Program includes four tests: the California Standards Tests, the California Modified Assessment, the California Alternate Performance Assessment, and the Standards-based Tests in Spanish.

The STAR Program for 2010–11 has four components:

  • California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA)—The CAPA is an alternate performance assessment to the CSTs in English-language arts (ELA), mathematics, and science. It is an individually administered assessment for pupils with significant cognitive disabilities who have an individualized education program (IEP).
  • California Modified Assessment (CMA)—The CMA is an alternate assessment to the CSTs in ELA, mathematics, and science for eligible pupils who have an IEP and meet the CMA eligibility criteria adopted by the SBE.
  • California Standards Tests (CST)—The CSTs are criterion-referenced tests that assess the California content standards in ELA, mathematics, science, and history-social science.
  • Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS)—The STS are criterion-referenced tests aligned to the California content standards for reading/language arts and mathematics.

STAR Testing is just around the corner with test being given between April 17th and May 3rd, depending on your school.

STAR Testing is important because:

– Helps place kids in the appropriate class each year

– Used to appropriate funds in the district

– Can identify subject weaknesses in a student

– Colleges are starting to look at them to help determine admittance

– Some teachers give extra credit for doing well. 

We have access to past tests and can help your student prepare to do their best and knock it out of the park. 

Don’t wait… book your appointment today (7 days a week)! 

Contact samantha@studyhut.com or call 1-310-546-2408

A Parent’s Role in Helping a Child Do Well In School

November 6th, 2012

Kids today have it rough. With all the competition to get into top ranked schools, parents are starting earlier and earlier to give their little academics a head start. But when does a parent’s involvement in their kids school work become a hindrance? Like most things, it’s all about a balance.

Studies show that children with parents who stay actively involved with their schoolwork will test better than kids with parents who don’t. So stay involved! Ask questions, congratulate success and encourage asking for help in more difficult subjects. Parents should know when their kids have a test and except to see the grade for it. This holds their student accountable for their grades. When parents do get back their kids work, reward their efforts. This doesn’t mean taking your daughter to buy a new IPod every time she brings home her Friday spelling test. But it does deserve a high five or a hug. (And remember parents, B grades are still fridge worthy!) Parents should be concerned with lower grades. When problem areas in their kid’s classes arise, steps should be taken to find extra help for their students. Begin with asking to see homework and review all problems that they have trouble with. If problems continue, check in with the teacher and see what else you can do to make sure your child keeps up with work.

When involvement becomes a hindrance rather than helpful is when parents begin to micromanage. Parents must remember that students should be expected to do their homework—and not because Mom stands over their shoulder until it’s done. Establish a set routine and stick to it. Your little study monkey should know that every day like clockwork, when he/she comes home, they makes a snack and start on homework. If your student is having trouble in school, run through their completed homework for mistakes, then help them with the questions they had trouble with. If your student normally tests well in school, ask if they completed their homework each night and trust that they have fulfilled each assignment completely. This allows your student to see that they need to be responsible for their own work and that you except them to be in charge. If they begin to slack on tests, start reviewing their homework again. Students need to learn how to be accountable for their studies. Writing down assignments, organizing papers and planning when to study are lifelong skills that they will need as a student as well as a professional.