Corona del Mar APUSH Tutor Tips

January 21st, 2016

AP Classes are no joke. They come with a heavy work load, and it is easy to feel overwhelmed. Here are some Corona del Mar APUSH tutor tips to keep you afloat!

Quick 1-2-3 Tips

I have my quick 1-2-3 that I usually go after first (any Corona Del Mar APUSH tutor worth a nickel should be able to give you these tips…):

1) Make a list of all grades lower than an 85%

2) Attack the lowest grades first:
-Make chapter outline
-Take practice quizzes/online tests on that material
-Take section review/chapter review tests from book or study guides

3) Make flashcards on all missed questions from review quizzing (each card needs 5 bullet points on the back hitting these three areas: a) definition b) historical significance c) political, social, economic implications

Corona del Mar APUSH Tutor Tips

General Corona del Mar APUSH Tutor Tips

Overall there should be some major units to review that the teacher hammers (and really what the College Board/AP test likes to drill). Understanding the major pillars from each unit, and re-reading the study guides and ANNOTATING as you read, will help to keep the major points at the top of your mind.

Know the major players from each unit, what their contributions were, and how they made lasting changes (why we are learning about them.)

In terms of execution of the plan, make a checklist with everything that you will study, and allocate a specific number of minutes to each portion of the checklist. That way you can assign a date/time to the task to ensure it gets done (and you can plan your life so you aren’t cramming like crazy).

We've been doing APUSH since before you were born!

Still feel like you’re drowning? Call Study Hut today or fill out a contact form to the right. Our expert tutors can give you the tools and knowledge you need to prepare for chapter tests and the big, bad AP!

A Newport English Tutor’s Grammar Guide

November 10th, 2015

Having trouble with common grammar rules? Come see a Newport English Tutor for help today! While it is easy to rely on spell check for corrections on papers and emails (we’re all guilty of it!), you will look very silly if you make these common mistakes. Spell check won’t catch them for you because they ‘look’ right to spell check. 

  1. Using I and me in the wrong places.
    It’s as simple as this: I is a subject, me is the object of a prepositional phrase. What’s a prepositional phrase? Glad you asked. This Newport English tutor loves a good prepositional phrase. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition and gives descriptive information like location: under, over, within, outside of, by, about, etc. Here’s a good website for more information about prepositions. 
           I am the subject of this sentence.
           This sentence is about me.

  2. Confusing there, their, and they’re.
    This is something learned in the third grade, so you should be very embarrassed if you make this mistake in a high school paper. There refers to place (it has the word here in it!!) They’re is a contraction meaning they are (the apostrophe ‘replaces’ the a!). Their is the possessive.
         The best Newport English tutors are found there.
         They’re going to eat all the turkey without me!
         Their mom really knows how to fill their bellies on Thanksgiving.
    *You’re (contraction for you are) and your (possessive) fall prey to this same mistake.

  3. Using ‘could of’, ‘should of,’ or ‘would of’ instead of ‘could have,’ ‘should have,’ or ‘would have’
    This actually comes from lazy speech patterns. When someone says ‘could’ve’ (the contraction for ‘could have’) many people hear ‘could of’. THAT’S NOT WHAT THEY’RE SAYING–or if it is, they’ve fallen into the trap as well. Don’t be lazy, people.
        “I wish that we could have gone to the World Series this year.”-a grammatically correct (and sad) Mike Trout

  4. Mixing up its and it’s.
    One is possessive and one is a contraction. It’s means it is, its means belonging to it.
        It’s the number one mistake!
        The cat scratched its nose.

  5. Using commas willy nilly.
    Commas are a part of grammar and not to used on a whim. They are not for separating ideas (that’s a period), or just to show a pause in thought. They go between independent clauses, or as part of a list, or in a number of other grammatically correct places. Refer to this awesome comma guide for direction!
          After the movie tonight, the soccer star will get eight hours of sleep.

Newport English Tutor's Fave Comic

Newport Biology Tutor

November 3rd, 2015

Are you having trouble in biology? Do terms like thylakoid, carbon fixation, meiosis, and apoptosis sound like gibberish to you? Don’t worry! We can help.

Here are 5 useful resources our Newport biology tutors have found that can help!

  1. If it’s photosynthesis that is giving you tons of issues, this is an easy-to-read and thorough study sheet put together by a Newport Biology Tutor from the Study Hut team. It covers everything from terms to structures to processes.
  2. Biology is a very visual subject. It is all about processes that are happening all around you, and even within you. Reading about it in a dry science textbook robs it of this vivacity. This website, CellsAlive, has some great animations that give these concepts life. Check out this animation of mitosis: http://www.cellsalive.com/mitosis_js.htm CellsAlive also has videoes of common biological processes as they happen in real life. For example, here is a video (with some great sound effects added) of what happens to a bacterial colony when it’s invaded by a virus: http://www.cellsalive.com/phage.htm
  3. If your biology book is overwhelmingly large, and incredibly daunting, BiologyCorner has clear, concise concept maps that can help condense the information to a more manageable, bite-size morsel. It has  pictures, coloring pages like this one (don’t laugh!  They’re really helpful!) puzzles, and quizzes.
  4. If it’s not precisely the material that’s giving you issue but you just have a hard time studying, you can use things like Chegg’s free flashcard app to put those flashcards right on your phone. That way whenever you have a free second (in the car, waiting in line, as you’re falling asleep) you can run through them. Science shows that spaced repetition increases memory. If your phone is actually the problem, not the solution, you can download apps like SelfControl Freedom (free), Disconnect (free) that will lock you out of the internet or your entire phone for a certain amount of time.
  5. So maybe you’ve tried these things and it still does not make sense. We’ve been there. For some, biology is just another language. Luckily we have Newport Biology Tutors that can translate biology into a language you can understand! We can make it fun and memorable and give you the one-on-one attention you need to dominate this biology class. To make an appointment or if you just have a few questions, fill out a contact form to the right, or call us today at 949-226-1573.

Newport Biology Tutor