Middle School Math

May 6th, 2019

At Study Hut, we believe that developing a strong mathematical prowess begins in middle school math, which is why we strive to provide junior high students with a strong foundation in Algebra and Geometry. Since opening in 2006, we have helped hundreds of middle school students find success in the complex and intricate subject of mathematics. Study Hut regularly tutors students from the surrounding middle schools every week, and math is often the first priority and focus of the sessions. With one-on-one tutoring, students who come to any of our Study Hut locations find a friendly, focused environment where they are free to ask questions and complete their work. The Study Hut approach to tutoring middle school math involves breaking down the material into its simplest parts and then constructing the larger concepts using those “building blocks”. Before a student even starts their homework or test review, we believe he/she must first firmly grasp the reasoning behind the new material. Through the application of logic and “common sense”, we encourage the student to begin thinking proactively, and the results are always positive. In fact, it’s not unusual to see a student’s math grade increase by one letter grade in just one month at Study Hut.

Middle School Math

At Study Hut, we pride ourselves in our unparalleled service to both the students we tutor and the parents of those students, and it’s part of the reason we received the South Bay Small Business of the Year Award in 2016. Our work is tailored specifically to the student, focusing on exact areas of their individual struggles. We take pride in our middle school student’s achievements. We all know very well how challenging middle school can be, socially and academically. We help students with the transition of middle school classes by being there for them, especially in the mathematics department.

 

Summer Tutoring for Elementary Students

June 17th, 2014

Summer Tutoring for Elementary Students

Summer tutoring at the Study Hut is a great idea for any elementary aged student. Many people assume that tutoring is only for struggling students who need remediation. While tutoring is great for these students and will help them get back on their feet grade-wise, tutoring is also beneficial for students who are doing great in class, especially over the summer. The summer vacation is three months long, a very long time to have to remember everything you learned last year. And most teachers like to jump right in when class starts, as they have enough material to cover in a year without including weeks of review. The new Common Core standards emphasize coherence in mathematics, so students need to be prepared to build on the previous year’s learning. Here is the link for more info:

http://www.corestandards.org/other-resources/key-shifts-in-mathematics/

So, how do you make sure you are ready for these new standards? Practice! Tutoring is the perfect way to keep your brain active over the summer. Just like you have to work out to keep your muscles in shape, you have to keep your brain working to keep it in “school shape”. Tutoring will keep your study skills sharp and have you ready to go as soon as class starts. No more wasting the first week of school trying to switch your brain back into “school mode.” Was there a subject last year you kind of learned, but were never clear on? Maybe something that is going to make another appearance this year? (Long division? Fractions?) Tutoring will clear that up without the added stress of homework and other subjects and tests. Confidence is a key to success in school, and confidence comes from practice. With a little bit of tutoring in the off months, the next year will be a breeze.

Truly a Superior Hut… A Letter to the Editor

May 10th, 2012

Editor:

I’m writing in regards to this “Study Hut” organization that I keep hearing so much about. I was told that all four “Huts” were basically the same, so I took the liberty of visiting them myself.

I have found that Hut 1, the Manhattan Beach Study Hut, is clearly, unequivocally superior to the other three, located in Redondo Beach, El Segundo, and Newport. I will now provide several reasons for my conclusion.

• When you walk in to Hut 1, your senses are treated to a comforting mix of botanical delights and earthy hues. The calming décor reminds one of a pleasant island retreat. It’s the most truly Hut-esque, is what I’m saying.
• However, the physical surroundings somehow pale in comparison to the explosion of aesthetic bliss also known as the Hut 1 staff. This is without a doubt the most collectively attractive group of people I have ever encountered.
• Additionally, the kids at Hut 1 are incredibly bright. Their studies range from mathematics, all the way up to calculus, to AP physics, to Chinese. I strolled past one table and heard a student and tutor discussing the complications with Kantian ethics. You can imagine my pleasant surprise when I discovered the student was in second grade and was also sporting a monocle. Clearly, this is an organization bursting with class and sophistication.
• When I was walking back to my Rolls, I noticed a tall freckled fellow attempting to grill burgers using nothing but small metal tongs and a pack of matches. I applaud your attempt to remain environmentally friendly.

I think you’ll agree that Hut 1 is simply an Eden. Hut 2, Hut 3, and Hut 4, while their efforts are commendable, simply cannot approach the talent and panache emanating from the original.

Good day,
Lord Rupert Everton

How do we comprehend other dimensions from our own? (Applied science and math)

August 10th, 2009

barilan_internet-thumbScience most definitely should not be handled by the faint of mind. People need to understand that the difference between three-dimensional and two-dimensional is the number of axis. Any two-dimensional (2-D) object is defined by a “x” and “y” axis , where as any three-dimensional (3-D) object is defined by a “x”, “y”, and “z” axis. In simpler terms, a 2-D object has length and width, whereas a 3-D object has length, width, and height, therefore giving it volume.

Physicists believe there are anywhere from 10 to 26 physical dimensions, each discretely chosen from the patterns of atomic string vibrations. How would you explain the 10th dimension to someone? Perhaps the way to understand something abstract is through an analogy. Instead attempting to explain the concept of 10 dimensions through scientific terms, I will first attempt to explain how we relate to 2-D objects through actions in the 3rd dimension, and then relate the 3rd and 4th dimension together. I really hope that you are able follow along since I think this is one of the most fascinating physical characteristics of our world, and very few people understand the concept of multiple dimensions. Well, here we go!

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