Summer Tutoring in Manhattan Beach

June 21st, 2015

After a fantastic 2014-2015 school year in Manhattan Beach, Mira Costa students are about to enjoy some fun in the sun.  While many have finished their SAT and ACT exams, others are starting summer school.  So for those of you who have to spend some morning time in the classroom, Study Hut Tutoring is here for you after class, at our new summer location: 1208 Artesia Blvd. in Hermosa Beach, across the street from Mira Costa High School.

Our geometry tutors are standing by– we are available for hourly sessions Monday through Friday from 9am to 7pm.  Whether you are getting ahead and taking Modern World History or US history, we have the local experts and books you need in order to earn A’s over summer.  It is important to get off on the right foot because the summer classes are especially condensed, often only 4-6 weeks long.  If it’s algebra tutoring you need, our top people are locked and loaded, ready to go.

Mira Costa High School isn’t the only school letting loose.  Students from Manhattan Beach Middle School are “free at last” from the rigors of Mr. Rucker’s Boulder, Mrs. Luke’s math homework and early morning tutoring sessions on Late Start Wednesdays.  Now that school is out, a lot of students are coming to Study Hut Tutoring for summer tutoring in Manhattan Beach to brush up on their pre-algebra skills, five paragraph essay writing, and Spanish verbs.  These basics are quintessential to earning top marks in the fall.  While buoy swims are equally as important for the body, the mind requires specific tuning in order to test well in early September.

For those students who have just wrapped up their last days at Grandview Elementary, Pacific Elementary, Robinson Elementary, and Pennykamp Elementary, there is a real transition that lies ahead as they enter into Manhattan Beach Middle School.  Now more than ever, incoming 6th graders will be put to the test.  But not to worry, Study Hut Tutoring is in your corner, having just helped a plethora of students with wide ranging needs, we are ready to help you tackle these challenges: we have the books, we know the curriculum, and you’re going to have a ton of fun knockin’ it out with us. Come in for engaging summer tutoring in Manhattan Beach to keep your mind fresh!

 

Catching Up in Online Classes

February 20th, 2015

Online classes can be difficult to keep up with.  Students can go to class when they want, and skip a day or two without any tangible repercussions.  Lack of face-to-face communication with a teacher can be discouraging when topics do not make sense.  Many online schools also have confusing and frustrating homework submission guidelines and processes.  All these factors lead many students to put off online classes until the last possible moment at the end of the semester.

Connor came in over summer to work with his tutor, Laura, on his online United States History class.  The long blocks of text assigned for reading every night were dry, and hard to get through.  Laura was working on getting her teaching credential to become a history teacher, so making history exciting was an easy task for her.  She explained the importance of the events that Connor had to learn about and their lasting effects on society today.  Turning history into something relevant instead of some distant story that happened a long time ago made the material interesting again and much easier to work with.

Being able to tie together the past and present made Connor’s essays a breeze.  Laura helped him research his topics.  They then turned that research into pertinent examples that helped support his thesis.  Laura’s retellings of history also helped Connor to answer and respond to other students in all of his discussion board assignments for each unit.  With all of Laura’s help Connor was able to complete all of his assignments and finish his online class on time!

The Value of Academic Reinforcement

April 16th, 2014

The Value of Academic Reinforcement

 

In almost two full years of working at the Study Hut, I’ve been able to see just how important supplemental education (in many forms) is for today’s young students. It’s nuanced at times, but there are myriad ways that seemingly inconsequential aspects of learning can change everything. Some of these things are just natural aspects of putting college students and grads in a room together and telling them to talk about academics, but in my tenure here I’ve watched the company grow and I’ve grown as a tutor and a person along with it. A particular session comes to mind here, and not because of how unique it was, but because it was extremely typical.

 

One of my weekly students, who we’ll call John Conner, came to me earlier this year to study for a history final. We hadn’t worked much together on history to this point, and John needed to catch up on almost everything covered on this test–we had our work cut out for us.

 

The first thing he asked me was: “Wait, so do you have this all memorized?” It was an honest question, and legitimate. Intuitively speaking, one would probably need to know a lot about US History to prepare someone study for a final exam nearly from scratch, but because of the way we work at the Hut, the way the Hut taught me to teach, and the very nature of supplemental academia, the session wasn’t about what I knew. It was about what John needed to know. We spent that hour combing through the text and his in-class notes to piece together what we agreed were the areas of importance. We spent the time looking for the questions, not the answers.

 

What I mean by all of this is that knowing is never part of my job. It’s about finding out, whether that means learning the material along with the students or just learning about the students themselves. The achilles-heel of today’s schools is the inability of schools to teach on a more personal level with each student. Of course, it’s a numbers game and it would be impossible for even the greatest instructors to personally teach lessons to all of their kids. But that’s the point. Because we’re in a unique position to help bridge the gap between teacher and student, concept and practice, we can always provide an invaluable set of tools for students of all kinds.

 

My knee-jerk reaction to John’s opening question was to say, “No, but you will soon.” This, to me, was the job in a nutshell. We don’t have the answers to the test your student will take, but we might know where to look.